Psoriasis Risks: More Than Skin Deep

The dry, scaly, and painful patches of skin typical of psoriasis afflict nearly 7.5 million Americans. This uncomfortable, chronic skin condition is most likely to develop on the joints, face, neck, trunk, arms, hands, feet, and scalp. Although a cure remains elusive, treatments are available to manage the symptoms. At first glance, some might assume…

Global Impact of Hepatitis

On a global level, viral hepatitis ranks in impact and seriousness as highly as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. Yet, viral hepatitis receives less funding and attention from global health policy makers and donors than each of those other three diseases. It’s a surprising disconnect. For example, the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals set a goal to…

Adherence Remains a Core Issue

Medications generally sit at the heart of a care plan for those with a chronic disease, yet medication adherence by patients continues to be an ongoing concern. Estimates note that 75% of Americans are not taking their medication exactly as directed by their health care professional. Meanwhile, nonadherence aligns with poorer outcomes, as well as…

Is It Multiple Sclerosis?

Diagnosing multiple sclerosis (MS) can be trickier than one would think. There is not a single test that can be used by itself to rule in or rule out an MS diagnosis. Rather, an entire profile is developed based on medical history, a neurologic exam, and lab tests (including an MRI, evoked potentials, and spinal…

Even When Treatment Fails, There’s Still Hope

There has been – justifiably – so much good news about very effective treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections that it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that not everyone is cured with these treatments. Yes, the sustained viral responses are incredibly high for most genotypes of infection. However, there are some…

Multiple Myeloma Patient Education Series (Part 5 of 5)

This summer I am sharing guest blogs from a variety of experts. This week’s blog is the fifth and final installment in a multi-part series about multiple myeloma from my colleague Dr. Margaret Henderson who has a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Colorado. –Dr. Stephen Vogt Welcome to the final part of…

Get Mobile to Save Time and Money

Health care is going mobile more than ever before and BioPlus is meeting this mobile challenge. By the end of this year, the mobile health app marketplace is expected to reach $26 billion as consumers increasingly turn to mobile application solutions to manage healthcare. Both patients and doctors are on-board with mobile health-related apps. A…

Multiple Myeloma Patient Education Series (Part 4 of 5)

This summer I am sharing guest blogs from a variety of experts. This week’s blog is the fourth in a multi-part series about multiple myeloma from my colleague Dr. Margaret Henderson who has a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Colorado. –Dr. Stephen Vogt Welcome to the fourth installment in a 5-part patient…

Multiple Myeloma Patient Education Series (Part 3 of 5)

This summer I am sharing guest blogs from a variety of experts. This week’s blog is the third in a multi-part series about multiple myeloma from my colleague Dr. Margaret Henderson who has a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Colorado. –Dr. Stephen Vogt Welcome to the third installment in a 5-part patient…

Multiple Myeloma Patient Education Series (Part 2 of 5)

  This summer I am sharing guest blogs from a variety of experts. This week’s blog is the second in a multi-part series about multiple myeloma from my colleague Dr. Margaret Henderson who has a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Colorado. –Dr. Stephen Vogt Welcome to the second installment in a 5-part patient…

Multiple Myeloma Patient Education Series (Part 1 of 5)

This summer I will be including some guest blogs from a variety of experts, starting with my colleague Dr. Margaret Henderson who has a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Colorado. Dr. Henderson has a lot of experience with multiple myeloma, which she will be sharing in a 5-part patient education series. –Dr….

Message from the ‘Ramblin’ Man’

The year was 1972 and the Allman Brothers Band released the album “Eat a Peach.” I just about wore out that piece of vinyl. If you have a soft spot in your heart for that hit album and this southern rock band, then I’d bet that you, like me, were sad to learn of the…

Living Longer with Breast Cancer

The chances of a woman developing breast cancer in her lifetime remain high, but there is good news in terms of post-treatment survival which is up to 89.7% (for five years). The high survival rates are due, in large part, to advances in treatment options. One of these is the medication Xeloda® (capecitabine) from Genentech….

Hepatitis C ‘Finish Line’ Moves

The incredible scientific advances leading to the development of numerous choices in highly effective hepatitis C medications should mean a plummeting of the number of Americans with this life threatening disease. It’s now known how this disease is spread, what it does to the liver, and – most importantly – how to cure it for…

‘Aspirin a Day’ for Cancer Prevention?

Millions of American adults already take a daily aspirin to protect their hearts; the research on aspirin and cardiovascular health is clear and beneficial. Over the past two decades, scientific studies have been accumulating about the potential for aspirin – when used regularly – to provide an additional benefit: that of cancer risk reduction. The…

A World Without Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C has been around for a long time; however, the virus was not scientifically identified until 1989. A few years later, the FDA approved the first treatment for this disease. This treatment, based on interferon, was the only treatment we could use at the time, but unfortunately did not provide high cure rates and…

PSA Test: Reconsidering the Recommendation

The prostate cancer screening test called PSA, which checks levels of the protein prostate-specific antigen, has a history checkered with controversy. The test can save lives, yet it has been long-known not to be perfect. For starters, there are an uncomfortable number of screening tests that turn out to be false positives, which leads to…

New Skin Cancer Drug Earns Fast-Tracked Approval

Skin cancer remains the most common type of cancer. Of the several varieties of skin cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma ranks as a more uncommon type, yet it’s aggressive and tends to grow quickly and can be hard to treat once it spreads beyond the skin. Recently, the FDA reviewed a potential new treatment for Merkel…